ME Alumni Shares His Experience as R&D Test Engineer at Northrop Grumman

Mechanical engineering alumni Bryan Calungcagin, now a research and development test engineer with Northrop Grumman, returned to campus Wednesday with some advice. All that theory in courses like power plant design, control systems, and finite element analysis? Students are actually going to need it once they start working in the engineering field. Continue reading “ME Alumni Shares His Experience as R&D Test Engineer at Northrop Grumman”

Engineering Distinguished Lecture Panel on the New Face of Engineering in 2030

Will artificial intelligence put people out of jobs? Is the idea of working for one company your entire career obsolete? Will the engineering field include previously underrepresented groups? And how important are so-called soft skills?

These are some of the questions tackled by the industry panel at Thursday’s Engineering Distinguished Lecture, which was timed to coincide with CSULB’s Imagine BEACH 2030 crowdsourcing campaign to examine the future. Continue reading “Engineering Distinguished Lecture Panel on the New Face of Engineering in 2030”

Northrop Grumman Holds Resume Workshop for Post-Military Students

Five veterans attend a resume workshopIf you’ve served in the military, you probably have a long list of accomplishments to include on your resume. But those acronym-rich descriptions can require some translating to make sense to civilian hiring managers.

On Monday, recruiters from Northrop-Grumman were at the CSULB College of Engineering to help veterans present their military experience in a way that  stands out for hiring managers going through stacks of resumes.

“The resume workshop for veterans offered tips on how to translate a military background to a civilian-friendly resume,” said Eddie Jimenez, a Northrop Grumman university relations specialist. “The idea is to help them create better resumes.” Continue reading “Northrop Grumman Holds Resume Workshop for Post-Military Students”

Northrop Grumman Holds Resume Workshop for Military Veterans

DSC_0274In the military, the unit is more important than the individual, said Northrop Grumman’s D.N. “Doc” Massard. But that’s not the case in private industry, where you must stand out as an individual to get hired.

A Northrop Grumman military recruiter, Massard was at CSULB Thursday to provide resume advice for engineering students who are military veterans. The company also supports a study room where the College of Engineering’s 120 veteran students can gather. Continue reading “Northrop Grumman Holds Resume Workshop for Military Veterans”

Northrop Grumman to Fund Scholarships for Veterans

On Wednesday, the CSULB College of Engineering will mark the opening of a new Veterans Resource Center, along with scholarships donated by Northrop Grumman.

The new center in EN2-304 is nearly twice as large as the existing veterans study center in the College of Engineering. Besides providing a study area for the more than 100 engineering students who served in the military, the Veterans Resource Center is designed to provide veterans with educational support and a sense of community. Continue reading “Northrop Grumman to Fund Scholarships for Veterans”

Student Capstone Project Wins National Manufacturing Contest

PlaneKool prototype
The PlaneKool prototype Heinrich Gerhardt designed is half the weight of competitors.

Senior capstone projects are supposed to measure students’ experience and knowledge—and in the case of Heinrich Gerhardt, there’s a lot to measure.

A Northrop Grumman engineering designer for more than a decade, Gerhardt headed back to school part-time in order to get a promotion at work. He’s been attending Cal State Long Beach for five years now, and is enrolled in Manufacturing Engineering Technology, a major that’s no longer offered.

“The joke in my household is, ‘Will I graduate first or retire first?’” said Gerhardt, who designs mechanical systems and wind tunnel test models in Northrop Grumman’s Test and Evaluation Engineering department. Continue reading “Student Capstone Project Wins National Manufacturing Contest”

College Celebrates Engineering Night at the Pyramid

Engineering Night at the Pyramid
CSULB engineering alumni Jim Green, left, with half-time contest winner AESB President Raina Aydelott and Dean Forouzan Golshani.

College of Engineering alumni, faculty, staff, and supporters helped cheer on the Long Beach State Men’s Basketball team to a 74-72 victory Saturday over top-ranked Hawaii State during the Inaugural Engineering Night at the Pyramid.

The evening began with a pre-game reception for members of the Dean’s Advisory Committee, featured an engineering-themed half-time show, and culminated with a post-game celebration that drew more than 200 College of Engineering alumni, supporters, faculty, and staff. Continue reading “College Celebrates Engineering Night at the Pyramid”

Is Southern California Ready for El Nino?

DLS-jackson.Speakers at the CSULB College of Engineering Distinguished Lecture Series Thursday agreed that a strong El Nino is brewing, and Southern California should be braced for higher-than-average rainfall this winter and spring. Although engineers and planners have learned much from past El Nino events, large-scale infrastructure improvements are still needed to prevent severe damage from future storms.

El Nino events are classified as weak, moderate, or strong, and usually peak in February. This year’s is strong, said Mark Jackson, meteorologist in charge of the Oxnard National Weather Service office, although it remains to be seen how many inches of rain it will deliver. “I’m not going to give my exact forecast for how many inches of rain we’re going to get. There are too many microphones and cameras here,” he said. Continue reading “Is Southern California Ready for El Nino?”

College of Engineering Working with Northrop Grumman on New Cockpit Design

Students Daniel Givens (l) and Ons Mami

by News @ The Beach

The future of cockpit design may be recast for tomorrow’s fighter pilot thanks to Northrop Grumman-sponsored research led by College of Engineering Dean Forouzan Golshani.

“There is a concept that cockpit design follows what was invented 50 years ago,” explained Golshani. “Generally, we have more sophisticated cockpits today but they really only have more knobs, gadgets and displays to work with. Our partners at Northrop Grumman think there is a better approach to designing cockpits for next generation fighters, including how our children play computer games.”

He explained that a cockpit is all about interaction with the environment and how information should be transmitted to the pilot.

“If you look at the way mission-oriented computer games are played, they control the same kind of things that a pilot does,” he said. “How much fuel do you have? How do you release a weapon or drop a package? Gameplayers deal with many constraints at any given time. They manage information in a way older generations never could. Looking at 2020 and beyond, it would be wise to design a cockpit for the future, not past, generation.”

The potential for the cockpit redesign is enormous. “This is a project that has the potential to take the combined team of Northrop Grumman and CSULB College of Engineering to a big funding agency like the Department of Defense,” Golshani said. “Northrop Grumman is very interested in making this their next contribution to aerospace, beginning with the first phase of preliminary studies.”

Student participation in the research will yield thesis topics for individual graduate students and senior projects for groups of students.

“They are engaged to perform research alongside faculty members,” said Golshani, who hopes to learn as much from his students as they do from the project. “I hope they take with them the experience of participation in a real-world project that they can see from the beginning. This is their chance to be part of a realistic project that looks to the future.”

One of the project’s most useful tools is a wheeled flight simulator based on the design of Northrop Grumman’s F-5A/B Freedom Fighter. “The instrumentation has been taken out but our research will depend on what we build around the cockpit,” he explained. “We will build a virtual cockpit. Everything has to be tested before we can say this can be part of our future cockpit. And once we are ready to build it, we will ask the question, where in the aircraft should it be?

“Who said the position of a cockpit should be fixed? Why not put it in the plane’s belly and let it come up like a submarine conning tower?” he said. “Whether the cockpit offers an actual view of the reality around it or not, that view is secondary to everything the pilot needs to do. We use this cockpit on wheels as a building block for the digital future. We want to examine the alternatives to the existing complex panels of instrumentation.”

Nothing is sacred when it comes to the new look. “Will this control be a button? Will it be a switch? What about when the pilot is flying in a smoke filled cockpit? If the pilot can’t see the switch or the button, what good are they?” he asked. “Between all the senses, we should be able to convey the information that we want. In many ways, the new design is influenced by assistive technology that is so sophisticated, it allows the blind to use a flight simulator. If a cockpit can be designed that accommodates a pilot who cannot see, it is certain that same cockpit will do a good job working with a pilot who can see.”

Golshani is pleased by the opportunity for the university.

“This is the kind of work that a progressive College of Engineering ought to be doing,” he said. “I’m very proud of the faculty members, particularly those we have hired over the last few years. They come from the best institutions and they are our greatest resources. I think we have an awesome team and I feel good about our chances of success.”

From: News @ The Beach – College of Engineering Working with Northrop Grumman on New Cockpit Design

COE Selected as Northrop Grumman Core University Partner

The College of Engineering has been selected to be one of Northrop Grumman Corporation’s Core University Partners. Northrop Grumman’s Core University Partners are selected for their ability to play a key role in generating the knowledge, innovation and talent required to maintain and increase the corporation’s global competitiveness.

The College of Engineering has a longstanding relationship with Northrop Grumman’s Southern California divisions, and has long provided them with engineers who go on to play vital roles in the company’s development of some of the nation’s most advanced systems. This relationship between Northrop Grumman and the College of Engineering has recently grown to include joint research endeavors—which is an honor generally reserved for prominent research-oriented institutions—and now the company’s corporate group is recognizing the COE as a Core University Partner.