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Anderson Receives Simms/Mann Institute Faculty Fellowship

Published: December 15, 2015

CSULB assistant professor Treshawn Anderson is among 13 individuals in California to be honored with a 2015-16 Simms/Mann Institute Faculty Fellowship, the California State University system announced.

As a fellow, she is expected to help expand research on the early childhood care and education settings for children birth to age 3.

“Receiving the fellowship, to me, means that there is an organization that appreciates the work of professionals who research children from birth to age 3, and will help us put our research into practice,” said Anderson, a faculty member in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences. “It also shows the importance of this age group and that conducting research and designing programs catered towards birth to these professionals and the children they serve is needed and necessary for the well-being of our youngest children.”

Specifically, Anderson and the other fellows will spend one year completing a project that translates neuroscience research into practical applications, in addition to incorporating an interdisciplinary cohort of professionals to focus on integrating the latest research into their classrooms.

“The Simms/Mann Fellowship will allow me the opportunity to collaborate with other birth-to-3 researchers in developing a program that will help advance the well-being of young children,” said Anderson. “Specifically, I am looking into developing a program for the Long Beach Public Library’s education system that will assist them with implementing infant/toddler story times—creating an optimal literacy experience for young children and their parents in addition to creating awareness of the importance of early literacy and what the literacy experience looks like for infants and toddlers.”

This year’s Simms/Mann Faculty Fellows and the schools they represent are:

  • Treshawn Anderson, assistant professor, family studies, CSULB
  • Gina Cook, assistant professor, child development, CSU Stanislaus
  • Kimberly D’Anna-Hernandez, assistant professor, psychology, CSU San Marcos
  • Kristina de Korsak, assistant professor, early childhood studies, Sonoma State
  • Sarah Garrity, assistant professor, child and family development, San Diego State
  • Donna Greene, associate professor, early childhood education, College of the Desert
  • Adrienne Seegers, professor, child development, Columbia College
  • Cynthia Sheaks-McGowan, professor, child development, Moorpark College
  • Sujatha Venkataraman, adjunct faculty, child development, Skyline College
  • Alison Ventura, assistant professor, kinesiology, California Polytechnic San Luis Obispo
  • Annie White, assistant professor, early childhood development, CSU Channel Islands
  • Amanda Wilcox-Herzog, professor, child development, CSU San Bernardino
  • Cheryl Williams-Jackson, tenured faculty, child development, Modesto Junior College
Treshawn Anderson
PHOTO COURTESY OF TRESHAWN ANDERSON
Treshawn Anderson

Anderson has a bachelor’s degree in child development and family studies and a master’s degree in elementary education-early childhood education from CSULB, and a Ph.D. in human development and family studies from Purdue University.

The Simms/Mann Institute for Education and Community Development was established in 2011 to address the complex issues facing families today. Technological advances, rapid globalization and unpredictable economic conditions have fostered a competitive, over-stimulating and stressful environment that threatens the healthy development of children and families in our communities.

“Through the generosity of the Simms/Mann Institute, the CSU is able to further invest in its early care and education program and bolster the number of graduates with early childhood expertise,” said California State University Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic and Student Affairs Loren Blanchard. “Learning starts at birth and by creating a knowledgeable and respected early care and education workforce, we will help create better students for the future.”

–Shayne Schroeder