MAE Department Salutes Its Alumni, Volunteers, and Graduates

CSULB Mechanical and Aerospace students on Monday gathered with faculty and advisors for a celebration before their graduation.

“This is a milestone. Your efforts and hard work have paid off,” said MAE Chair Jalal Torabzadeh. “It’s a great day to be proud of your achievements. This is also an opportunity for you to say thank you for all who helped you on your journey.”

Ross Ahlberg, who received MAE’s Distinguished Alumni Award, said CSULB’s mechanical engineering program provides a solid career foundation. Ahlberg, who graduated two decades ago, is now Vice President of Clinical Development at Applied Medical. Continue reading “MAE Department Salutes Its Alumni, Volunteers, and Graduates”

Chemical Engineering Department Celebrates Grads and Alumni

Chemical Engineering celebrated the accomplishments of graduates and alumni at its Department Graduation Monday.

Those who received Distinguished Alumni Awards are: Jamie Bartolome, Tami Lipscomb,

George McDaniel, and Maureen Price. The Graduate Dean’s List recipient for Chemical Engineering was Raja Sekhar Kalavacherla.

Elena Jacobina DeSanto was recognized as the Outstanding BS ChE Student. The Outstanding MS Thesis Award went to Srinivas Gavini, while DeSanto and Rebecca Noel Wyborski received Outstanding Honor’s Thesis Awards. Sreeja Reddy Gouni and Christie Sutanto were recognized with Outstanding Undergrad/Grad Research Awards. Continue reading “Chemical Engineering Department Celebrates Grads and Alumni”

Xerox VP Arnold Hackett Named CECS Distinguished Alumni

Arnold Hackett was one of nine children raised by a single parent. He is now vice president of alliance and partnership management at Xerox.

The 2001 CSULB computer science graduate said he has Xerox to thank—and also CSULB. “They helped me become what I am today,” he told students at the CECS Department Graduation.

Hackett, who earned his master’s in computer science while working at Xerox, on Monday received the CECS Distinguished Alumni Award. He was also named the Alumni Association’s College of Engineering 2017 Distinguished Alumni Award.

Hackett said a degree in computing is very powerful. “You’ve been given the tools to create and innovate and make your dreams a reality,” he said. Continue reading “Xerox VP Arnold Hackett Named CECS Distinguished Alumni”

CECEM Grads Recognized for their Achievement at Department Event

Students graduating from the Civil Engineering and Construction Engineering Management Department were recognized for their achievement Monday at the CECEM Department Graduation.

“Today’s event is organized for you to have another chance to meet with your faculty,” said Dean Forouzan Golshani. “On behalf of the faculty and staff of this university, we salute you as peers.”

David Callis ‘88, a Senior Vice President at Swinerton Builders, and Jeff Goodermote ‘10, director of Parking Structures at Swinerton, received CECEM Distinguished Alumni Awards. Callis and Goodernote both graduated from CSULB with degrees in Construction Engineering Management. Continue reading “CECEM Grads Recognized for their Achievement at Department Event”

Engineering Panel Explores Future of Southern California Aerospace

Virgin Orbit's Launcher One

Speakers at the CSULB College of Engineering lecture Thursday voiced optimism that the region’s skilled workforce, livability, manufacturing facilities, and efforts to draw new companies will help Southern California remain a vibrant location for aerospace.

P2S Engineering Vice President Kent Peterson, who moderated the spring Engineering Distinguished Lecture, said his father transferred from Pratt & Whitney to take a job at Douglas Aircraft in Southern California. “I don’t work in aerospace, but I can tell you my life has been affected by it,” he said. “The aerospace industry was a giant in Southern California. We did most of the country’s manufacturing.” Continue reading “Engineering Panel Explores Future of Southern California Aerospace”

Spring Engineering Lecture to Address Future of Aerospace in Southern California

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This month’s Engineering Distinguished Lecture will address a topic of concern to many in the region: the future of the aerospace industry in Southern California.

The rate of decline in Southern California’s aerospace manufacturing has been significantly higher than the rest of the nation. With full airplane assembly practically gone from California, there is little incentive for the vast aerospace supplier base to stay in the region. Unless proactive measures are implemented rapidly, there is a strong possibility that the high rate of migration may continue. The region must create an appropriate public-private partnership model as the basis for an ecosystem that will support the revival of this industry in Southern California. Continue reading “Spring Engineering Lecture to Address Future of Aerospace in Southern California”

Engineering Night at the Pyramid Stars Student-built Catapult

The College of Engineering this Saturday will be holding its 2nd annual Engineering Night at the Pyramid. Students, faculty, alumni, staff, and guests are invited to come cheer on the CSULB Men’s Basketball team as they take on University of California Irvine.

The game begins at 8 p.m. and will be televised on ESPN. A pre-game reception for alumni will be held at 6:30 p.m. in the Pyramid dance studio. For game tickets, visit www.longbeachstate.com/coe17. Alumni and faculty can RSVP to the game and reception at coe-dev@csulb.edu.

The College will also be marking its 60th anniversary with interactive displays. The anniversary will be celebrated throughout the year with historic photos posted on the College’s Facebook page

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Another highlight of Engineering Night will be a Man vs. Machine half-time game featuring a catapult built by Chemical Engineering seniors Nathanael Dunham, Jonathon Garcia, and Josue Alonso, under the direction of Chemical Engineering Professor Ted Yu.

Dating back to the Middle Ages, catapults were used to storm castle walls—and hurl rocks, fireballs, and hot tar. This wooden catapult uses bunjee cords for tension. It will be throwing a basketball and taking on a former 49ers shooter in testing its hoop skills.

Dunham said when Dr. Yu suggested the project, “it sounded like fun.” However, as in the case of most engineering projects, turning the idea into reality was much more difficult.

The trio admit that being ChemE students put them at a disadvantage. “Building it was the tricky part because we don’t focus on physics in our major,” said Alonso, adding that they found plans for building a catapult on the Internet.

They worked on the catapult mostly over winter break, testing it in Dunham’s backyard. Another challenge was that none of the students had previously measured or cut wood. “It sounded easy but ended up being hard,” said Dunham.

CEM Holds Speed Networking Dinner

Construction companies are always searching for top-notch graduates. And construction engineering management students are always on the lookout for internships and job opportunities to launch their careers. So what better way to connect the two groups than over dinner?

The CSULB Construction Engineering Management program’s inaugural Speed Networking event brought together 63 students and seven construction companies Wednesday evening. Students had the chance to eat salad with one company, dinner with another, and dessert with a third—with even more networking time after dinner. Continue reading “CEM Holds Speed Networking Dinner”

With Renewable Energy Comes Need for Large-scale Battery Storage

A rendering of AES's planned battery storage facility in Los Alamitos
A rendering of AES’s planned battery storage facility in Los Alamitos

Although exploding smartphone batteries have captured public attention lately, utilities around the country are battling an even bigger battery challenge—the need to create storage, said experts at the fall Engineering Distinguished Lecture Thursday.

Increased generation of renewable energy—especially solar—is quickly changing the game for utilities. Previously, nonrenewable energy allowed utilities in the state to better synch power generation with use in keeping with the requirements of the California Independent System Operator, which manages energy flow for 80 percent of California. Continue reading “With Renewable Energy Comes Need for Large-scale Battery Storage”