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California State University, Long Beach
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Fifth Annual

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FIFTH ANNUAL

Latino Health Equity Conference 

FRIDAY, MARCH 18  |  8:00 AM – 5:00 PM  |  USU BALLROOMS, CSULB

CONFERENCE WEBSITE  |  REGISTER HERE

On behalf of the Hispanic Health Opportunity Learning Alliance (H2OLA) and the National Council of La Raza (NCLR) / California State University, Long Beach (CSULB) Center for Latino Community Health, Evaluation, and Leadership Training, you are invited to attend the 5th Annual Latino Health Equity Conference. The conference will take place on Friday, March 18 2016, from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM at the USU Ballrooms on the CSULB campus.

This Conference aims to raise awareness and engage faculty, staff, students, and the larger community in Latino health equity research. The conference will provide a unique opportunity for interested individuals and professionals to collaborate with national thought leaders to promote health equity for Latinos and all underrepresented minorities nationwide. This year's theme is "Growing Healthy Cultures | Manteniendo Tradiciones Saludables:" We are pleased to collaborate with a stellar group of health innovation presenters that include Hortensia Amaro, PhD from the University of Southern California | Jose Luis Calderon, MD from Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science | and Marilyn Aguirre-Molina, EdD MS, from City University of New York.

Please feel free to forward this invitation to those you think would be interested in attending. We look forward to your participation.

This conference is made possible by a grant from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities: Grant# 5R25MD006851-05

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For More Information

www.LatinoHealthEquity.com

Mayan Santa Cruz

chhs-h2ola@csulb.edu

(562) 985-5312

What's Happening @ The Beach

CHHS Advising Welcomed 214 New Transfer Students During SOAR this Winter!

CHHS Advising

At SOAR, all CHHS advisors participated in the orientation and registration process for new transfer students. In the classroom, advisors presented important information to our new students, including:

  • Who we are and what we do
  • Our Advising Syllabus, which outlines key responsibilites and expectations each individual has in the advising relationship
  • How to navigate our website and access our social media platforms
  • Critical major specific information and materials

Each transfer students received individual advising help, inlcuding a degree checklist and a completed major requirements worksheet based on their specific transfer credit. New students were also provided with faculty mentor information and any major student organizations available for them to join. Advisors even assisted students with registration in the computer lab to ensure they enrolled in the correct courses. Thanks advisors for your tireless work!

Experience One Free Week of LifeFit Center Membership!

LifeFit

Happy Customers

The LifeFit Center @ The Beach, an on-campus health and fitness facility for Long Beach community members age 49+ and CSULB employees of all ages, is offering free one-week memberships to CSULB employees within each college and to all other University staff starting February 1st - April 1st. College of Health and Human Services employees can try out their free week from February 1st - 5th.

The LifeFit Center offers a variety of programming options to CSULB employees, including group fitness classes, personal training, nutritional counseling, and more. Click Here to learn more about the LifeFit Center and your membership options. For questions about your one-week membership trial, please contact LifeFit Center Assistant Director Emily Sopo at Emily.Sopo@csulb.edu.

 

CHHS' Rashida Crutchfield Weighs in on the Homeless Student Problem in

ROLLING STONE MAGAZINE

Homeless College Student

As quoted from Rolling Stone Magazine, see the full article here Tens of Thousands of College Students Have Nowhere to Sleep

"Last year, more than 56,000 students identified as homeless on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, form. But the real number of homelss students is almost certainly higher: That number excludes those who cannot identify as homeless because they lack sufficient proof, such as verification from a shelter. It also does not include the unknown number of college students who intermittenly experience housing insecurity but handle it on their own by couch surfing with friends or sleeping in their car or campus library, never telling a university official...

According to Rashida Crutchfield, an assistant professor at California State University, an assistant professor at California State University, Long Beach's School of Social Work who is researching housing insecurity in her university system, there is no norm when it comes to how students end up homeless. 'If I emancipate or age out of foster care, I am more likely to be homeless. That exists, but not all students who are homless have had foster care experience,' she says. 'We've got an increase in students who have limited economic stability. Out students are working, part-time and full-time, and they're supporting themselves and they're helping their families. A lot of students are just living paycheck-to-paycheck and if something happens, if some emergency happens, they can end up homeless.'"

 

Speech-Language Pathology Duo Honored

inside CSULB

SLP Honorees

From the inside CSULB blog, click here for the original article by Shayne Schroeder SLP Honored

"CSULB Department of Speech-Language Pathology professor Geraldine P. Wallach and associate professor emerita Betty McMicken were honored at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) annual convention held in Denver, Nov. 12-14.

Wallach, who also serves as the department's thesis coordinator, was awarded the Honors of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, given to members for their distinguished contributions to the discipline of communication sciences and disorders. It's the highest honor the assocation bestows upon its members in recognition of those who have enhanced or altered the course of the professions...

McMicken, who retired from CSULB last spring, received the Frank R. Kleffner Lifetime Clinical Career Award, given by the ASHA Foundation to an individual in recognition of outstanding contributions to clinical science and practice in communication science and disorders over a period of at least 20 years and who has altered or accelerated the course of quality of clinical care in audiology and/or speech-language pathology."

 

Fighting for Agricultural Health and Safety Abroad

APHA International Award

Every year, the Occupational Health and Safety Section presents four awards at the American Public Health Association Annual Meeting. These awards are granted to highly deserving individuals or organizations that provide tireless advocacy for the health and safety of workers in the U.S. and internationally. The 2015 International Award was presented to Dr. Sarath Gunatilake, Director, Employee Health Metropolitan State Hospital and Professor Health Science Department, California State University, Long Beach. This the first time a Sri Lankan was given this prestigious award. Click here to watch a video of the ceremony and listen to Dr. Gunatilake's speech on the importance of protecting agricultural workers from harmful pesticides all over the world: APHA Award Dr. Gunatilake.

This award was presented primarily in recognition of Dr. Gunatilake’s research work with Dr. Channa Jayasumana, from the Rajarata University Medical School, Sri Lanka, on Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) among rice paddy farmers in Sri Lanka. The disease has already killed 23,000 farmers. Their research findings indicated that the main cause of CKD in Sri Lanka is the contamination of the drinking water and the food supply with pesticides-mainly Glyphosate- and heavy metals such as Arsenic and Cadmium that is present as contaminants in synthetic fertilizer. These results were published: http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/11/2/2125. This article received worldwide attention. Subsequently, four other articles were published by Drs. Gunatilake and Jayasumana in support of this hypothesis. Today, World Health Organization has declared Glyphosate as a possible human carcinogen (possibly causing cancer). Several developed nations including Netherlands and France have followed Sri Lanka’s example and banned marketing of Glyphosate. Major marketing companies in Switzerland and Germany have now withdrawn this product from the market. Other countries that have now imposed bans or severe restrictions on Glyphosate include Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Argentina, El Salvador, and Bermuda

In 2009 The Southern California Public Health Association presented Dr. Gunatilake with the Ruth and Milton Roemer Award for his services on disaster management to Sri Lanka during the South East Asian Tsunami and his efforts on training health workers in the Long Beach Health Department. Dr. Gunatilake has trained dozens of Sri Lankan physicians in the U.S, on Community Medicine, Health Education and Medical Administration and also served as foreign examiner in the Post Graduate Institute of Medicine in Community Medicine. In 2011, the Sri Lanka Government Recognized Dr. Gunatilake for the outstanding services rendered to the Sri Lankan Health Care sector with a special awarded presented by the Counsel General in Los Angeles. In 2014 California State University, Long Beach awarded Dr. Gunatilake the Research Accomplishment of the Year award. In the past Dr. Gunatilake has worked as a consultant to the World Bank, World Health Organization, The Asian Development Bank, the USAID and the South Pacific Commission.