Intellectual Contribution Guideline

updated April 24, 2015

Intellectual Contribution Classification Process.

The Intellectual Contributions Task Force is a college-wide body that serves as a jury for the ranking of journals that are not included in the current journal list or that are to be re-categorized. The criteria for determining the appropriate classification of a journal (Categories A through E) or a conference (Categories C through F) include:

  1. Sponsorship: Is the conference sponsored by a nationally recognized academic or professional organization, or an accredited university or business school?
  2. Submission: Does the conference require the submission of a full paper that will be subject to a peer review process to the conference, or does it require the submission of an abstract only?
  3. Ownership: Is the conference/journal owned by a for-profit entity?
  4. Registration/Submission Fee: How much is the registration fee? If a journal, how much is the submission or publication fee? (At CBA, we placed a cap of $350 on Conference registration fees in 2001.)
  5. Editorial/Review Board: What is the composition of the editorial boards and the reviewers? What percentage of the editors and reviewers are affiliated with AACSB-accredited business schools (or the substantive equivalent overseas)?
  6. Maturity: How long has the conference or journal been in existence?
  7. Participation: How many attend the conference?
  8. Proceedings: Does the conference call its proceedings a journal?
  9. Journal Size: Does the journal have more than 20 articles in a single issue?

 

Category Intellectual Contribution Items Points
A. Type I Journal

Items in this category represent the highest level of achievement. In each discipline, there are a few journals, usually no more than 4-5, that are considered as the premier journals in the discipline. These journals are generally viewed as the highest quality and most selective journals in the discipline, and they employ an external and blind peer-review process in making editorial decisions.

 

 

 

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B1. Type II Journal A journal in this category is widely recognized as an “A” journal that is a notch below Type I.

 

 

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B2 Type III journalI

Items in this category are the result of original basic scholarship and are intended primarily for an academic audience. They will have been subjected to an external and blind peer-review process.In each discipline, there may be as many as 20 journals that can be considered to be high quality and that have substantial visibility within the discipline. These journals have substantial technical or theoretical requirements and are difficult to get into. Scholarly books can also be categorized as type III.

 

 

 

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C. Type IV journal

Items in this category are the result of original basic scholarship, applied scholarship, or instructional development. They are intended for an academic audience that can include business and/or government researchers. They will have been subjected to an external and blind peer-review process. A journal in this category has recognizable quality in its field and has a low-to-moderate acceptance rate and a low-to-moderate number of invited articles. Many of these journals have impact factors, but they are generally lower than those in the Type III category. At many reputable schools, these would be considered A-, B+, or B outlets. Examples in this category include:

  • Article in Quality journal as defined by CBA
  • Research monograph

 

 

 

 

 

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D1. Type V journal

Items in this category are intended for a variety of audiences, including academics, business and government researchers, government officials, business professionals and practitioners, and students. Most will have been subjected to an external and blind peer-review process, but some will have been subjected to an editorial review process. If the journal is peer reviewed, it will have relatively lower visibility and a higher acceptance rate than a Type IV journal. New journals for which there is little information about quality and impact are placed in this category and can be re-categorized when adequate information becomes available. Examples in this category include:

  • Article in a Support journal as defined by CBA
  • Article in edited professional journal
  • Article in edited pedagogical journal
  • Textbook (first edition)

 

 

 

 

 

 

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D2. Selected Conferences

Full paper presented at the most selective national scholarly meeting of a key disciplinary association (e.g AAA, ABC, NCA, ICA, AFA, FMA, ARIA, ALSB, AIS, ICIS, DSI, AoM, AMA, ACR, AIB, and BALAS).  A contribution will be classified as D-P if an abstract or less than a full paper is presented at the most selective national scholarly meeting of a of a key disciplinary association (e.g AAA, ABC, NCA, ICA, AFA, FMA, ARIA, ALSB, AIS, ICIS, DSI, AoM, AMA, ACR, AIB, and BALAS).

 

 

 

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E. Conferences, Presentations and Other Contributions

. Items in this category are intended for a variety of audiences, including academics, business and government researchers, government officials, business professionals and practitioners, and students.  They will have been subjected to at least an editorial review process. Examples in this category include:

  • Editor in Chief
  • Chapter in scholarly book
  • Successful competitive grant proposal to an external agency (e.g., NSF)
  • Cases with instructional materials (published)
  • Complete paper presented and published in the proceedings of a regional scholarly meeting of selective key disciplinary association
  • Complete paper presented and published in the proceedings of a selective national or international scholarly meeting that is sponsored by a key disciplinary association but which is not the major annual conference of that association
  • Special session presentation with or without a published paper or abstract (short or long) at the most selective scholarly meeting sponsored by a key disciplinary association
Complete paper presented and published in the proceedings of a national scholarly meeting of a disciplinary association that is not a key disciplinary association

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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F. Other Activities

. Items in this category are publicly available but lack the originality and level of external validation inherent in Categories A through E. These items are likely to involve significant effort and some degree of external validation. Examples in this category include:

  • Associete Editor and editorial board members
  • Reviewer of a peer review journal article
  • Scholarly book (revision)
  • Textbook chapter or teaching module (first edition or revision)
  • Textbook (revision)
  • Instructional software (publicly available)
  • Presentation to a scholarly organization not covered in category D or E, regardless of whether a complete paper or abstract is published
  • Special sessions not in category E
  • Poster session at any scholarly meeting
  • Publicly available working paper published in a working paper series
  • Professional presentation
  • Textbook supplemental materials
  • Published book review
  • Introductions published in journals (e.g. special issue introductions)
  • Book reviews or commentaries published in journals
  • Invited scholarly presentation at an outside faculty research seminar or workshop
Publicly available instructional materials with adoption by others

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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